Last edited by Kazitaur
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

6 edition of Women and the book trade in sixteenth-century France found in the catalog.

Women and the book trade in sixteenth-century France

by Susan Broomhall

  • 333 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by Ashgate in Aldershot, Hampshire, England, Burlington, VT .
Written in English

    Places:
  • France
    • Subjects:
    • Women in the book industries and trade -- France -- History -- 16th century.,
    • Women and literature -- France -- History -- 16th century.,
    • Women printers -- France -- History -- 16th century.,
    • Women booksellers -- France -- History -- 16th century.,
    • Women publishers -- France -- History -- 16th century.,
    • France -- Social life and customs -- 1328-1600.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 241-273) and index.

      StatementSusan Broomhall.
      SeriesWomen and gender in the early modern world
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsZ305 .B78 2002
      The Physical Object
      Paginationviii, 282 p. ;
      Number of Pages282
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3959773M
      ISBN 100754606716
      LC Control Number2001099636

        Charlotte Guillard, the printer of De Consensu Evangelistarum, was one of an estimated fifty-four women in the book trade in 16 th-century Paris. She worked from , when she married printer Berthold Rembolt. Their print shop was at the sign of the Soleil d’Or. Guillard took over operations when Rembolt died around   It was also a virtue to be sought by the head of any great household in the sixteenth century and, in slightly reduced form, by the women in such families as well. As a style associated with the medieval past, sixteenth-century readers could hear about it in the reprintings of the old fairy tale of Mélusine. The guests at the fortnight-long Pages:

      The Kingdom of France in the early modern period, from the Renaissance (circa –) to the Revolution (–), was a monarchy ruled by the House of Bourbon (a Capetian cadet branch).This corresponds to the so-called Ancien Régime ("old rule"). The territory of France during this period increased until it included essentially the extent of the modern country, and it also included Capital: Paris (–), Versailles (–), . This book is an account of life and death in early modern France. It is an analysis of the crime stories which men and women told their judges in order to try to save themselves from the gallows. To receive a royal pardon for murder in 16th century France, a supplicant had to tell the king a story. Thousands of such stories are found in the French.

      the sixteenth century: excluding drama after 33 Improvisation in the Arts of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Early Drama, Art and Music Monograph Series The Role of Women in 16th Century England Background Women Gaining Power Women's Jobs Tasks for a Housewife Farmer/ Merchant Wife's Jobs In Conclusion Women had no rights and had almost no chance at having an influential position Women would loose all control of their lives once.


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Women and the book trade in sixteenth-century France by Susan Broomhall Download PDF EPUB FB2

Women and the Book Trade in Sixteenth-Century France constitutes the most comprehensive assessment of women's contribution to contemporary publishing yet available.

Broomhall's innovative approach and her conclusions have relevance not only for book historians and French historians, but for a broad range of scholars who work with other European literatures and histories, as well as women's by: Focusing on the vastly understudied area of how women participated in the book trades, not just as authors, but also as patrons, copyists, illuminators, publishers, editors and readers, Women and the Book Trade in Sixteenth-Century France foregrounds contributions made by women.

SUSAN BROOMHALL is Senior Lecturer in Early Modern European History at the University of Western Australia. Her previous publications include Women and the Book Trade in Sixteenth-Century France and Women's Medical Work in Early Modern : Susan Broomhall.

Susan M. Broomhall. Women and the Book Trade in Sixteenth-Century France. Women and Gender in the Early Modern World.

Aldershot and Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing Company, viii + pp. index. append. bibl. $ ISBN: This book will be of interest to historians of early modern women.

Women and the Book Trade in Sixteenth-Century France constitutes the most comprehensive assessment of women's contribution to contemporary publishing yet available. Broomhall's innovative approach and her conclusions have relevance not only for book historians and French historians, but for a broad range of scholars who work with other European literatures and histories, as well as women's studies.

Susan Broomhall innovatively brings together women's activities in all aspects of the book trade in sixteenth-century France, exploring the ways in which the development of the print medium after shaped women's.

Women and the Book Trade in Sixteenth-Century France Book   November   with  17 Reads  How we measure 'reads' A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the Author: Susan Broomhall.

Susan Broomhall is the author of Women and the Book Trade in Sixteenth-Century France ( avg rating, 3 ratings, 0 reviews, published ), Early Mode /5(10). Focusing on the vastly understudied area of how women participated in the book trades, not just as authors, but also as patrons, copyists, illuminators, publishers, editors and readers, Women and the Book Trade in Sixteenth-Century France foregrou.

SUSAN BROOMHALL is Senior Lecturer in Early Modern European History at the University of Western Australia. Her previous publications include Women and the Book Trade in Sixteenth-Century France and Women's Medical Work in Early Modern France. Ingrid Akerlund, Sixteenth-Century French Women Writers, Lewiston, Mellen,pp., is a puzzling book, dealing with Marguerite de Navarre, Anne de Graville, Louise Labe, Camille de Morel, Helisenne de Crenne, Nicole Estienne, and Marie de Romieu, all of them regarded.

Reformation Women: Sixteenth-Century Figures Who Shaped Christianity's Rebirth by Rebecca VanDoodewaard. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking “Reformation Women: Sixteenth-Century Figures Who Shaped Christianity's Rebirth” as Want to Read: Want to Read.

saving. Want to Read/5. Tired of Tudors and Borgias. If you enjoy historical fiction set in sixteenth century France, here are some novels to seek out: Classics The Princesse de Cleves () by Madame de Lafayette (various translations).Set during the reign of Henri II, the story of married noblewoman Mme de Cleves' unrequited love for the dashing Duc de Nemours and the tragic consequences her confession of this.

BOOKS AS GIFTS IN SIXTEENTH-CENTURY FRANCE The Prothero Lecture By Professor Natalie Zemon Davis, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. READ 7 JULY I 'SINCE he isn't able to sell his books,' Erasmus said of a fellow scholar in'he goes about offering them as gifts to important people; he makes more that way than if he had sold them.' Erasmus's shrewd.

Footnotes 1. See Margaret Hunt, ‘ Hawkers, bawlers and mercuries: women and the London press in the early enlightenment.

Women and history, 9 (), 41 – 68, and Michael Treadwell, ‘ London trade publishers – ’, The Library, Sixth Series, 4/2 (June ), 99 – 2. Henri‐Jean Martin, Livre, pouvoirs el sociétéà Paris au XVIIe siècle (– The Remarkable Role of Women in 16th Century French Basque Law Codes.

A couple of months ago I published a piece in the Guardian about my decision to start a rare book business focused on work by women, particularly women writers, and the unequal treatment of books by women in the trade.

The piece received a good deal of attention, and I didn't know if anyone would notice or pay attention, particularly outside of the rare book trade. Jeanne Giunta, book publisher of Lyon, approach to women's work in the sixteenth century, a period of population increase, economic expansion, and religious change.

We still need for sixteenth-century France an equivalent to Alice Clark's Working Life of Women in the Seventeenth Century and to. A sound and readable narrative introduction to France in the “long sixteenth century,” especially strong on political history.

The bibliographical essay is an excellent guide to further reading. Potter, David. A History of France, – The Emergence of a Nation State. London: Palgrave Macmillan,   The Gift in Sixteenth-Century France. (Reviews). Kingship and the Commonweal: Political Thought in Renaissance and Reformation Scotland.

(Reviews). Women and the Book Trade in Sixteenth-Century France. "'Women's Worlds in Seventeenth-century England' presents a unique collection of source materials on women's lives in sixteenth-and seventeenth-century England.

The book introduced a wonderfully diverse group of women and a series of voices that have rarely been heard in history, from a poor Devon servant-girl to Queen Anne herself.

Drawing on unpublished, archival materials, 'Women's Worlds.Kerver’s Widow and Female Printers in the Sixteenth Century Darrah Culp. During the early sixteenth century, Thielman Kerver was an exemplary bookseller and printer of many Books of Hours manuscripts sold throughout Europe.

When he died inhis business was taken over by his wife, Yolande Bonhomme, who became one of the most notable femaleAuthor: Darrah Culp.VIII THE TRADE IN SKINS IN THE FIFTEENTH AND SIXTEENTH CENTURIES.

Changes in fashion, first the preference for a wide variety of more valuable furs in place of northern squirrel skins, and secondly the declining popularity of furs of any sort, were certainly of decisive importance in the history of the manufacture of furs in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.